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Long-term trends and short-term budget issues put the crunch on state funding for higher ed.

A recent Washington Post article by Daniel de Vise explores the “historic collapse in state funding for higher education” that has occurred over the last two decades. While a large part of the piece focuses on the plight of UC Berkeley – whose state-funded share of its operating budget has gone from nearly half (47 percent) in 1991 to one-tenth (11 percent) this year – the California-based school is just one of the victims in a nationwide, 20-year trend that has increasingly left public universities out in the cold during state budget negotiations.
 
As GovWin’s state budget project extensively covered (available to subscribers), governments are using every tool at their disposal to make up for daunting revenue shortfalls. In addition, 2011 marks the end of federal ARRA funds, which many states have used to shield themselves from even deeper cuts. As my Industry Analysis colleague and Sr. Analyst Chris Cotner put it in his analyst perspective on higher education budget woes: “After the 2011 budget cycle, federal stimulus funding ended in a ’funding cliff’ that left most states in need of making difficult choices in the face of continued slow economic growth and related budget woes. In fact, in 2011, 18 states reported needing to make mid-year, unanticipated education cuts in order to remain solvent.”
 
There is no shortage of examples of states putting this philosophy into practice. Pennsylvania, California, Texas and Arizona have all undergone nasty budget battles in the last few years, which have resulted in steep cuts to K-12 education and public universities. Indeed, as the Post article alludes to, targeting education funding has been a nationwide trend among state governments looking to tighten their belts. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, “At least 25 states are making major, identifiable cuts in higher education.”
 
This has led to no program or earmark being safe, and public schools and universities have not escaped the program and budget-cutting knives. Colleges have made up for this shortfall through larger classes, ballooning tuitions costs, grants and private donations. The problem is that a good chunk of grant and private funding winds up being specifically earmarked for certain programs or priorities, giving universities less flexibility with how they spend their money.
 
Analyst’s Take
                                                                                                     
It is difficult to foresee this as having anything other than a net-negative impact on the education IT vertical market, though to what extent remains to be seen. According to Cotner’s analysis, “The biggest vertical general-fund expenditure loser for FY 2012 is higher education, at an estimated $3.16 billion,” and “the end tally in 2012 is that higher education will experience a net loss [across the country], both in terms of general fund and all-fund expenditures.”
 
Should this discourage forward-thinking IT vendors from jumping into the education market? Not necessarily. Earlier this year, I wrote about the promising potential for education IT contracting over the next 5-10 years and, to a large extent, I think that analysis still holds over the long term. There are plenty of factors (like personnel losses through layoffs and attrition, cloud migration, and decades of paper-based records and documents in need of digitizing) that point to a continuing and emerging need for advanced IT solutions in K-12 and higher education.
 
We still work and operate in an information and technology economy. The slow, steady transition in education from the 20th century to the 21st won’t be stopped by budget cuts. However, reports like these are helpful in offering a sobering reminder that universities (and the states that fund them) are still facing some negative long-term headwinds as well as the aftermath of one of the worst financial and economic crises of the last 80 years. It may be wise for vendors to keep their powder dry in the short term while waiting out the aftereffects of the recession, and plan a more robust higher education presence in the intermediate-to-long term.
 
To read my recap of the EDUCAUSE 2011 Conference in Philadelphia, go here (subscription required).
To read Chris Cotner’s complete analysis on higher education budgets, go here (subscription required).
To learn more about the primary/secondary education IT market, read Deltek’s 2011-2016 forecast here (subscription required).

IT Vendors: Beware the Overselling of K-12 Virtual Education

A recent Associated Press story on K-12 distance learning perfectly captures all the perils IT vendors face in the overselling of virtual learning. IT vendors should recognize that the potential total number of students who can be enrolled in K-12 online programs is limitless. However, the real gains from online learning will come as supplements to the bricks-and-mortar high school classrooms (i.e., blended online-onsite learning), not as a replacement for these classrooms.
 
Let’s take at look at the hype around virtual learning with excerpts from the AP story: “But as states pour money into virtual classrooms, with an estimated 200,000 virtual K-12 students in 40 states from Washington to Wisconsin … regulation isn't moving nearly as fast as the virtual school boom.”
 
Unfortunately, few reliable data sources exist for virtual school enrollment. Most widely cited statistics are produced by organizations with a stake in promoting such a boom. A 2009 U.S. Department of Education meta-study, which is cited in the AP story, offers this statistic:
 
Online learning—for students and for teachers—is one of the fastest growing trends in educational uses of technology. The National Center for Education Statistics (2008) estimated that the number of K-12 public school students enrolling in a technology-based distance education course grew by 65 percent in the two years from 2002-03 to 2004-05. On the basis of amore recent district survey, Picciano and Seaman (2009) estimated that more than a million K-12 students took online courses in school year 2007–08. (PDF p. 13)
 
Enrolling in “a technology-based distance education course” is a far cry from being a full-time online student. However, from a vendor perspective, a seat is a seat, whether the student is taking multiple courses or is full time online. Picciano and Seaman (cited in the DOE study above) have produced more recent peer-reviewed research (2011) predicting “that by 2016, five million K-12 mostly high school students will be enrolled in these (online) courses.”
 
For further analysis, please read the complete analyst recap, located here.

 

Cleveland considering radio system partnership

The city of Cleveland and the Ohio Southwest Regional Communications Network (SWRCN) are considering a radio communications partnership. Cleveland had budgeted more than $30 million for the build out of a new radio system that was awarded to Motorola earlier this year, and as part of this costly endeavor, the city may merge systems with the SWRCN at no cost.

 

The SWRCN, which operates on a Motorola system as well, consists of Middleburg Heights, Berea, Brook Park, Parma Heights, Strongsville, North Royalton, Olmstead Falls and Olmstead Township. The reason for the proposed merger is to increase interoperability through 13 different licensed frequencies that Cleveland uses, improve connectivity, and allow for better coverage among the major systems in Northeast Ohio. The merger is up for vote at the start of 2012.

 

In the past, Cleveland has addressed limitations in its ability to communicate across agencies. Within Cuyahoga County, there are more than 40 types of radio systems along with a diverse set of frequencies used by all public safety agencies. The integration between the city and the SWRCN would alleviate many of the problems associated with radio coverage across the county.

 

Analyst’s Take

 

Integration of communications systems has become more of a norm in order to ensure coverage in the event of a natural disaster or major emergency, especially when systems experience incompatibilities with neighboring jurisdictions. Since both Cleveland and the SWRCN operate on a Motorola system, if an upgrade is pursued or a contract renewed, it will likely be done regionally under the same system to control costs.

 

As more cities and counties consider regionalizing their public safety systems, it may create additional opportunities for vendor solutions and services, like the need for a systems integrator. Vendors should stay atop upgrades within smaller counties and municipalities as well as research regional and state systems for possible mergers.

 

Deltek’s Straight Dope on State Budgets, Pt. V: How They Improved Finances & GovCon Biz Prospects

This blog contains exerpts from the full Deltek GovWinIQ article, located here (subscribers only).

The National Association of State Budget Officers (NASBO) and the National Governor’s Association (NGA) released a report in November 2001 outlining the fiscal condition of the states. As highlighted by NASBO, state general funds (GF) budgetary conditions are actually improving in FY 2012, albeit slowly. NASBO projects growth to continue, with slowly improving economic conditions in FY 2012 and 2013. Deltek projects similar improvement in state all funds (AF) budgets, with slow growth in 2013 and improved growth looking forward to 2014 and 2015. Simply, expenditures, revenues, balances, and rainy day funds are all up and improving. This is good news for the GovCon community.

However, even with this good news, most states made changes and cuts to achieve balance. In this installment of the straight dope series, Deltek examines some of the measures states took to adjust their finances and get government business moving in the right direction again.

As discussed in previous Deltek articles, state expenditures are on the rise again, which is an excellent sign for the business community. Figure 1, below, provides a vivid graphic illustration of the turmoil caused by the recession and the more recent recovery. However, states made many cuts and adjustments to get back to this place of positive growth.

Figure 1: Annual Percentage General Fund State Budget Increases


Examining expenditures for 2012, state priorities for cuts and growth become more apparent. In figure 2, below, the number of states making significant adjustments in expenditures, both positive and negative is fairly high across most verticals. This is likely due to states needing to make many budgetary adjustments in order to bring the books back in balance after the turbulent recession. Subscribers have access to more detailed analysis of state spending changes in 2012 in the full article, here.

Figure 2: 2012 State Budget Vertical Adjustment


States took widely varied approaches to balancing budgets. Looking at figure 4 and 5, below, it is clear that both agency and employee cuts were heavily favored in 2011 and 2012 by many states. With most governors and legislatures being ‘tax’ averse, another popular state strategy is through adding new fees (essentially these amount to user taxes without having the burded of the tax label). Another underreported strategy engaged by many states the last several years is reducing aid to localities, which, by default, increases the burden on these same localities to provid services. Subscribers have access to more detailed analysis of state budget balancing strategies, here.

Figure 4: State Strategy Types for Budget Balancing


Probably most interesting to the business community are the states that turned to privatization as a strategy for balancing the budget, including: Illinois (both years), Louisiana (both years), Florida, Michigan, and Ohio. While not specifically identified in the NASBO survey, many other states are looking toward a variety of privatization solutions (North Carolina serves as a recent example). While these states provide obvious business opportunities, virtually every state is in the process of considering or discussing the privatization opportunities that may reduce their cost of doing business.

Deltek’s Take:

The end result of all this cutting, adjusting, and improving economy is that state financials are improving. As mentioned in the previous article in this series, improving business prospects will translate into improved contracting opportunities for the GovCon community. The best part of the news is that Deltek projects growth to continue with fewer state expenditure cuts looking ahead into 2013 and 2014. In fact, by 2014, state spending should be back to pre-recessionary levels and growing upward.

Deltek’s Recommendations

·        Find additional opportunities to present IT as a cost-savings and efficiency-oriented solution to reduce operating costs.

·        Look to engage directly with state governments in developing cooperative and collaborative solutions.

·        Ambitious GovCon entities can look toward helping a state privatize parts of their operation to cut costs.

·        Contractors should stay engaged in the state market, as financials are solid, looking forward.

·        Strategize now to remain in position through slow growth of 2012 and be prepared for accelerated opportunities in 2013 and 2014.

Source: Deltek and NASBO

Follow all of the GovWin State and Local Top Opportunities, Reports, and Podcasts,
here.

Follow Chris on Twitter, here.

A grim future for state mental health services

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) released a report in November that drew light to the impacts of continued state funding cuts to mental health services and, subsequently, states’ ability to provide services to individuals with mental illness. While strapped budgets and slashed expenditures are commonplace in today’s economy, it’s important to note funding cuts for mental health services are not solely due to the recession; they’ve actually been on the chopping block since the 1980s.

Mental health facilities are not the only ones taking a hit. Due to the increasing lack of mental health facilities and availability of services, the mentally ill are being pushed to emergency rooms, homeless shelters and jails. Additionally, the nation’s grim economy, high unemployment rate, and unstable fiscal outlook all contribute to more and more individuals seeking mental health treatment, which further widens the gap between the availability of services and those who need them.

Although some states have increased general fund appropriations for mental health services, fiscal year 2012 is not looking any better for most. Many states have already cut millions of dollars from general funds for mental health services, while others are reallocating those funds to Medicaid recipients, leaving those devoid of Medicaid even further in the dust.

Deltek recently released an Analyst Perspective that examines mental health funding cuts throughout the nation and provides recommendations for vendors looking to assist states with mental health services solutions in light of diminishing funds.   

Follow Deltek’s Health Care and Social Services Team on Twitter @GovWin_HHS, or connect with us through LinkedIn. Sign up to receive Deltek’s Health Care Roundup newsletter, delivered to your inbox weekly.

 

Seven states split third round of Race to the Top funds

Today, the Department of Education (DOE) awarded federal Race to the Top (RTTT) funds to the tune of $200 million split among seven states. This is the third round of awards for the $4 billion program aimed at revitalizing America’s K-12 education system through reform and innovation. The latest batch of winners includes:

 

  • Arizona - $25.1 million
  • Colorado - $17.9 million
  • Illinois - $42.8 million
  • Kentucky - $17 million
  • Louisiana -$17.5 million
  • Pennsylvania - $41.3 million
  • New Jersey - $37.9 million

The seven states were all finalists in last year’s competition, in which 12 states split $3.4 billion. Nine runners-up were eligible to compete, but South Carolina opted out, and California’s application was deemed incomplete.

 

While this round’s $200 million is a steep drop from last year’s $3.4 billion in distributed funds, the Department of Education hopes states will still pursue many of their original initiatives such as raising academic standards/scores; improving teacher-evaluation systems; and boosting science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) instruction. Top priorities for the newly-awarded states include:

 

Arizona: The state’s education reform plan, “Arizona Ready,” includes the establishment of five regional education centers with coordinators and content specialists hired to oversee operations; transitioning to Common Core State Standards (CCSS); and improving data systems. The state will also pursue IT initiatives to support course mapping and student-teacher-data link processes.

 

Colorado: The state recently established a Race to the Top office to assist in overseeing education reform, which will include transitioning to college- and career-ready standards; improving educator effectiveness; advancing STEM education; and adopting a new educator evaluation system (Deltek Opportunity 65254).

 

Illinois: The state is heavily focused on building local educational agencies’ (LEAs) capacity, and will create a Race to the Top Leadership and Implementation team as well as a Center for School Improvement. The state also plans to revamp performance reporting (Deltek Opportunity 57345), create P-20 STEM programs of study with STEM learning exchanges (Deltek Opportunity 64745), and produce LEA assessment systems (Deltek Opportunity 57354).

 

Kentucky: The state will invest in its Continuous Instructional Improvement Technology System (CIITS), which is described as a “one-stop shop” technology support system for state educators. Funds will be utilized to employ various components of the CIITS, including an educator development suite to rank educator effectiveness scores, and a formative assessment system.

 

Louisiana: The state intends to expand its instructional improvement system, Enhanced Assessment of Grade-Level Expectations (EAGLE), and implement a comprehensive performance management system to measure educator success. 

 

New Jersey: The state plans to develop an instructional improvement system along with instructional support tools and model curricula. Other goals include piloting a principal evaluation system and employing a new teacher evaluation system throughout the state.

 

Pennsylvania: The state aims to increase access to online coursework and enhance its online educator resource portal. Two Web-based initiatives are also in the works: a public school performance report card to highlight academic achievement and economic standing, and an educator dashboard with classroom data. Additional goals include offering professional development opportunities for educators, overhauling teacher and principal evaluation systems, and improving charter school communication and technical assistance strategies.

 

In total, 21 states and the District of Columbia have received RTTT awards, with more to come. The 2012 omnibus bill that Congress passed last night authorizes $550 million for the continuation of the program, and also expands eligible applicants to local education agencies.

Though funds are diminishing and most states have delayed RTTT implementation efforts, the DOE is still determined to ensure the program’s success, even if it means revoking awarded funds from underperforming states.

 

On Wednesday, the department sent Hawaii, a round-two winner, a letter notifying the state it has been placed on “high-risk status” for inadequate progress in carrying out its RTTT goals. A year ago, Deltek reported on Hawaii’s big plans for utilizing its $75 million award to reform education – plans of which have apparently fallen short. The DOE has restricted the state’s remaining funds and will conduct an on-site review early next year to determine whether to withdraw the award altogether. Subsequently, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced Thursday that the DOE plans to release state RTT progress report cards over the next month.

 

The Deltek Straight Dope on State Budgets, Part IV: Growing Rainy Day Funds

The National Association of State Budget Officers (NASBO) and the National Governor’s Association (NGA) recently released a report outlining the fiscal condition of the states. Some media coverage has sensationalized the report and the states’ fiscal conditions. This analysis examines NASBO numbers and related business implications, in black and white. Deltek believes in presenting the straight dope.

As highlighted by NASBO, state general funds (GF) budgetary conditions are actually improving in FY 2012, albeit slowly. The economic recovery is still tepid. NASBO projects growth to continue, with slowly improving economic conditions in FY 2012 and 2013. Deltek projects similar improvement in state all funds (AF) budgets, with slow growth in 2013 and improved growth looking forward to 2014 and 2015. So, while some media outlets would lead the business community to believe that doom and gloom lie ahead for the states, the data shows otherwise. Simply, expenditures, revenues, balances, and rainy day funds are all up and improving. This is good news for the GovCon community.

In this installment of the blog series, Deltek offers a snapshot into state GF rainy day fund balances.

Rainy day fund balances are also up in the states. This means that not only are overall balances improving, but states are back to saving for any future economic crises. Again, this is fantastic news and indicates improved state fiscal health. More specifically, total rainy day balances have risen from $21 billion in 2010, to $24 billion in 2011, and up to $30 billion in 2012. Should another unforeseen financial crisis arise, states will be better able to offset the challenge with their own savings. In the end, this helps stabilize state governments and mitigates the risk of doing business with them.

See figure 4, below for a graphical representation of the data.

Figure 4: State Rainy Day Fund Balances FY 2010 to 2012


Source: Deltek and NASBO

Deltek’s Take

·        Despite sensationalized media coverage, state financials are improving.

·        States made the difficult decisions to cut during the recession and as ARRA expired; contractors should look for fewer cuts and more growth, moving forward.

·        Some states will concentrate revenue and expenditure growth on returning spending to 2008 levels, as opposed to engaging in new projects.

·        Nearly all states should surpass 2008 revenue and spending in 2013 or 2014. This will place new projects back on the forefront of state budgets.

Deltek’s Recommendations

·        Contractors should stay engaged in the state market, as financials are solid, looking forward.

·        Strategize now to remain in position through slow growth of 2012 and be prepared for accelerated opportunities in 2013 and 2014.

Subscribers have access to the full article and data set, here.

Stay tuned for the rest of the Deltek Straight Dope series.


Follow all of the GovWin State and Local Top Opportunities, Reports, and Podcasts,
here.

Follow Chris on Twitter,
here.

Supreme Court ruling on health care reform just around the corner

Without a doubt, a majority of states have been dragging their feet when it comes to passing legislation for establishing a health insurance exchange – 36 states, to be exact. It is shocking that – despite the 2014 deadline being a mere two years away – only 14 states have passed legislation to set up an exchange, while 10 have yet to introduce any.

Though Massachusetts and Utah are still the only states that have operational insurance exchanges at this time, a bulk of states are immersed in planning efforts. For a few states including Arkansas, Florida and Louisiana, the Supreme Court’s ruling on the constitutionality of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act has provided enough justification to cease any planning efforts for an exchange. However, a majority of states are executing a wiser approach, which is why vendors should put their worries to rest. The reality is that these insurance exchange opportunities are not going anywhere.

Next spring, the Supreme Court will consider the following:

  • Whether Congress has the power to require individuals to purchase health insurance.
  • Whether Congress can coerce states to expand Medicaid by threatening to withhold funding from resistant states.
  • Whether the individual mandate is severable from the rest of the overhaul and if its invalidation means getting rid of the law as a whole.
  • Whether legal arguments brought against the health reform law are premature since the mandate will not be implemented until 2014.

Regardless of the Supreme Court’s ruling, there will still need to be a solution to the health insurance coverage issue. The insurance exchange mandate was created in response to the overwhelming number of individuals without health care. The idea is that these marketplaces will allow individuals to compare and obtain affordable health insurance options. For that, even if the rule is overturned, states will still need to respond to the matter in some way. Though it is up to the feds to make sure health coverage is more accessible and affordable, the more challenging component of delivering the benefits is up to the states.

Even if the Supreme Court rules the Health Care Law unconstitutional, there will still be many states considerably far along in preparations for setting up the one-stop insurance shops, or will have at least decided the portal itself would be beneficial. Also noteworthy, quite a few states challenging the constitutionality of the law have received or will be applying for establishment grants, which further proves states are seeing value in these exchanges.

 

Moreover, vendors should not only pay attention to states that have passed legislation to set up an exchange, since it is clearly not a true indicator of progress. Instead, vendors need to focus on states that have received or will be applying for federal funding under the establishment grants, in addition to the 60 percent of states that have released solicitations for planning, consultation and gap analyses. For that, vendors should not be deterred by the Supreme Court ruling. States are going to move forward with exchanges for the benefits of their residents.

Deltek will be releasing a report in January on health insurance exchange efforts across the states, so stay tuned! In the meantime, check out our latest in-depth Analyst Perspective on insurance exchanges.

 

The Deltek Straight Dope on State Budgets, Part III: Improved Ending Balances

The National Association of State Budget Officers (NASBO) and the National Governor’s Association (NGA) released a report this week outlining the fiscal condition of the states. Some media coverage has sensationalized the report and the states’ fiscal conditions. This analysis examines NASBO numbers and related business implications, in black and white. Deltek believes in presenting the straight dope.

As highlighted by NASBO, state general funds (GF) budgetary conditions are actually improving in FY 2012, albeit slowly. The economic recovery is still tepid. NASBO projects growth to continue, with slowly improving economic conditions in FY 2012 and 2013. Deltek projects similar improvement in state all funds (AF) budgets, with slow growth in 2013 and improved growth looking forward to 2014 and 2015. So, while some media outlets would lead the business community to believe that doom and gloom lie ahead for the states, the data shows otherwise. Simply, expenditures, revenues, balances, and rainy day funds are all up and improving. This is good news for the GovCon community.

In this installment of the blog series, Deltek offers a snapshot of state GF ending balances.

After some of the nearly disastrous budgetary practices leading up to and through the early stages of the recession, by and large, states are now more fiscally conservative and better able to balance budgets. For the 29 states not yet back to 2008 revenue and expenditure levels, balanced budgets may still mean not funding everything to the level they would like. Despite some of these budget shortcomings, fewer states are ending the year in the red in FY 2011 and 2012, compared to the years through the recession. In fact, the average year-end balance went up from $160 million in FY 2010 to $379 million in FY 2011. While down slightly in FY 2012 to $313 million, average ending balances are still up significantly from the recessionary trough.

Higher ending balances are good news for the GovCon community. Simply, as more states end the year in the black, they will be better able to move forward with procurement and new projects in following years.

See figure 3, below for a graphical representation of the data.

Figure 3: State General Fund Ending Balance Changes FY 2010 to 2012


Source: NASBO and Deltek


Deltek’s Recommendations

  • Contractors should stay engaged in the state market, as financials are solid looking forward.
  • Strategize now to remain in position through slow growth of 2012 and be prepared for accelerated opportunities in 2013 and 2014.

Subscribers have access to the full article and data set, here.

Stay tuned for the rest of the Deltek Straight Dope series.


Follow all of the GovWin State and Local Top Opportunities, Reports, and Podcasts,
here.

Follow Chris on Twitter,
here.


Source: NASBO and Deltek

Mass. Among States Looking to Develop Assessment/Accountability Systems to Boost Education

Earlier this year, the Obama Administration began an effort to offer more flexibility from federal education mandates in exchange for a commitment from various states to adopt reforms that would boost their overall student achievement.
After the announcement, 11 states formally submitted requests to the U.S. Department of Education for waivers from key provisions related to No Child Left Behind (NCLB), with numerous other states indicating they plan to apply for waivers at a later time next year. The 11 states which applied for waivers are Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Tennessee.
In exchange for receiving waivers, these states must detail plans for meeting several goals, including developing academic standards that prepare students for college or a trade; creating statewide measures of student performance and plans for reforming schools that don’t meet requirements; and developing teacher and administrator evaluation systems tied to student performance.
Over the past weeks, Deltek has focused on a few of the states which have submitted initial NCLB waiver requests, and this week turns the spotlight on the state of Massachusetts. In its request, Massachusetts indicated the waiver opportunity will provide educators with flexibility regarding specific requirements of NCLB in exchange for rigorous and comprehensive state-developed plans designed to improve educational outcomes for all students, close achievement gaps, increase equity, and improve the quality of instruction.
As part of its waiver request, Massachusetts disclosed two IT-specific initiatives, including a plan to 1) Develop and Administer Annual Statewide, Aligned, High-Quality Assessments that measure student growth (IT project A), and 2) Provide a State-developed Differentiated Recognition, Accountability, and Support System (IT Project B).
In the request, Massachusetts said it may join a consortium of states in developing a Comprehensive Assessment system (see IT project A above – there is no Deltek tracked opportunity which is related) which will measure student knowledge and skills against a common set of college- and career-ready standards, and provide an accurate measure of student achievement across the full performance continuum. It will also measure student growth over a full academic year or course, among other things.
In assessing its students, Massachusetts may also utilize the Galileo Instructional Data System. This assessment and data analysis system enhances the ability of teachers, school and district leaders, parents, and students to identify trends in student learning, improve classroom instruction, and ultimately raise student academic achievement.
Elsewhere, Massachusetts may also seek to develop and implement a state-based system of Differentiated Recognition, Accountability, and Support (see IT project B above – there is no Deltek tracked opportunity which is related). The goal of this enhanced system is to improve student achievement and school performance; close achievement gaps; and increase the quality of instruction for students. This system is expected to be implemented no later than the 2012-2013 school year.
While Massachusetts seeks to develop and improve its overall systems of Assessments and Accountability, the state currently has 5 Deltek tracked opportunities dealing with primary/secondary education. At this point, none of the above-listed IT projects are listed among Massachusetts’ Deltek tracked education opportunities.   

 

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