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Half-way Through FY 2015, How Much Are Agencies Spending on Contracts?

It’s April, and that means we are half way through fiscal year (FY) 2015. So I thought I would take a look at the available federal contracting data to see what can we tell so far about how much federal departments have spent on contracts at the mid-point in the year and see what might be in store for us in the second half of FY 2015.

For comparison and context I looked the federal contract obligations reported for each federal agency for FY 2014, quarter by quarter, and then the first two fiscal quarters of FY 2015, which just closed at the end of March. Then, to get what I thought would be a conservative approach to estimating what spending might look like for the remainder of FY 2015 I took 90% of each agency’s total FY 2014 contract spending and subtracted out what agencies have already reported for actual Q1 and Q2 contract spending. In other words, my assumption is that agencies would spend at least 90% of what they did last year. Finally, based on this 90% spending assumption I calculated each agency’s FY 2015 Q1 and Q2 relative percentages of total (90%) estimated obligations.

Contract Obligations Compared

Historically, the twenty top-spending departments accounted for about 98% of all federal contract obligations, so I focused my attention on these departments. In FY 2014, these accounted for $85.9B and $105.2B in total contract obligations for Q1 and Q2 respectively. For comparison, these departments reported $104.7B and $141.7B in contract obligations for Q3 and Q4 respectively for FY 2014. (See table below.)

In FY 2015, these top twenty have reported $89.3B and $34.1B for Q1 and Q2 respectively, although DoD lags in their financial reporting by up to 90 days so Q2 is understated. Still, if these top agencies spend 90% of what they did in all of FY 2014 they will have more than $270B left to obligate in the remaining two quarters of this fiscal year.


Observations

  • A handful of departments have Q1 FY 2015 obligations lower than they did in Q1 of FY 2014 (DoD, USAF, State, DoT, Ed, and Labor). Most have marginally higher obligations year-over-year, although Navy reported over $6B (+40%) more in obligations in Q1 in FY 2015 than last year.
  • More departments appear to be lagging in Q2 FY 2015 compared to Q2 of last year and some of these are fairly large relative proportions. For example, HHS shows a $1B (-24%) decrease in Q2. Similarly, VA has reported a $1.1B (-30%) decrease. Finally, State, GSA, and DOT each have reported about a 50% drop in Q2 FY 2015 obligations from Q2 FY 2014. Of course, given the DoD’s three-month reporting delay we will not know the contracting rates among those departments until this summer.
  • Taken together, the four defense branches in Q1 FY 2015 have reported $3B more in obligations than they reported in Q1 of FY 2014, although the DoD and Air Force have reported lower levels year-over-year.  

A graphical representation of the relative proportions of each department’s contract spending gives a sense of seasonality and/or changes from year to year. Due to the sheer number of departments I have split these into Defense and Civilian segments. This further highlights the yearly changes for Navy, HHS, VA, State, GSA, and DOT. (See charts below.)


 


 

This kind of macro-level analysis is useful in getting a general sense of quarterly and yearly patterns across the departments. Of course, the remaining FY 2015 obligation estimation depends on its main 90% assumption. Last year, this approach pointed to roughly $285B in combined FY 2014 Q3 and Q4 obligations among the top twenty departments. A year later, the final FY 2014 Q3 and Q4 data shows that actual obligations came in at $246.4B, so at first glance it appears that my 90% assumption was a bit optimistic. However, the difference turns out to be a matter of timing rather than magnitude. The final FY 2014 Q1 and Q2 obligations given above come in at $69B higher than what agencies reported at this time last year, reflecting revisions due to lagging obligation data being added later in the year. So the numbers effectively washed out once the dust settled. Unfortunately, there is no reliable way of predicting how consistently agencies will report their contract spending from year to year.

As most federal business development people will attest, understanding your agency’s spending patterns goes a long way to being able to successfully work with them to get contracts awarded as well as develop your yearly business plan. 

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Originally published for Federal Industry Analysis: Analysts Perspectives Blog. Stay ahead of the competition by discovering more about GovWin FIA. Follow me on Twitter @GovWinSlye.

 

Congress Passes FY 2015 Funding – Civilian Highlights, Part 1

The U.S. Congress passed an omnibus funding bill for the remainder of fiscal year (FY) 2015 that includes $1.1 trillion in total in discretionary federal funds, roughly half of which goes to federal civilian departments and agencies.

Federal News Radio reported that the Senate voted 56-40 late Saturday for the bill that will fund most agencies through September, the end of FY 2015. The House of Representatives had voted two days earlier on the spending measure, passing it 219-206.

The final bill removes concerns over the possibility of government shutdowns for the rest of the fiscal year and address funding for each of the agencies covered under the twelve individual appropriations bills that traditionally make their way through Congress. The only exception in full-year funding is the Department of Homeland Security, which is funded by at continuing resolution (CR) levels through Feb. 27, 2015, due to congressional concerns over White House immigration plans. Future funding will be taken up by the next Congress.


 

Department Highlights

Energy

Department of Energy funding of $27.9B supports programs across the department’s five primary mission areas: science, energy, environment, nuclear non-proliferation, and national security.

  • National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA): Funding for NNSA sees an increase of $200M over FY 2014 levels to maintain the safety, security, and readiness of the nation’s nuclear weapons stockpile. This increase brings NNSA’s funding to $11.4B for FY 2015.
  • Funding includes $8.2B for weapons activities as well as $1.2B for naval reactors. Advanced simulation and computing efforts receive $598.0M, including $50.0M for activities related to the exascale initiative.
  • Energy Programs: Support for programs that encourage U.S. competitiveness drive an increase of $22M over FY 2014 enacted levels, bringing funding for Energy Programs at DOE to $10.2B.
  • Science Research: Funding for energy science research is maintained at FY 2014 levels, providing $5,071M to strengthen innovation and support basic energy research, development of high-performance computing systems, and exploration into next generation clean energy solutions.
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E): The advanced research organization ARPA-E receives $280.0M, $45M below the level requested for FY 2015.

Commerce

Department of Commerce funding of $8.5B marks an increase of $286M above the level enacted for FY 2014.

  • Patent and Trademark Office (PTO): $3,458M for the U.S. Patents and Trademark Office, the full estimated amount of offsetting fee collection for FY 2015. The Patents and Trademark Office had nearly $651M in unobligated balances at the end of FY 2014.
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST): $675.5M for the scientific and technical core programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
    • This amount includes $15M for the National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence and up to $60.7M for cybersecurity research and development.
    • National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education receives $4M. These funds also provide $16.5M for the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC), which includes up to $6M for the lab-to-market program and up to $2M for urban dome programs.
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA): $5,441M for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This amount includes $3,333.4M for coastal, fisheries, marine, weather, satellite, and other programs.
  • Census Bureau: $1,088M for the Bureau of the Census, which includes $840M for periodic censuses and programs.
  • International Trade Administration: $472M in total program resources for the International Trade Administration. $10M of those funds are expected to be offset by fee collection, resulting in a direct appropriation of $462M.  Of those funds, up to $9M ins for the Interagency Trade and Enforcement Center, up to $10M is for SelectUSA, and Global Markets are funded at levels at least equal to FY 2014.

Go to Part 2 of Civilian Highlights, or check out our Defense Highlights of the FY 2015 Omnibus here.

Fellow GovWin Federal Industry Analysis (FIA) analysts Kyra Fussell, Angela Petty, and Alex Rossino contributed to this entry.

Federal Busy Season – Which Agencies are Ramping Up to Spend in September?

August is here and that puts us right at the mid-point of the fourth and final quarter of the fiscal year – the federal “busy season.” But that doesn’t mean that half of this business is already accounted for. In fact, historical spending trends suggest that things are just ramping up for its climax in September and several agencies will have billions of dollars to spend on IT before they face expiring funds.

Recently, I showed how federal agency spending trends in Q4 accounted for an average of 39% of agency contracted IT spending for the year, translating into an average of $30 billion in IT products and services contracted during the fourth quarter. Yet, the spending is even more concentrated than that. Upon further analysis, we can see that federal contract spending is disproportionately large in September, the final month of the fiscal year. Agencies obligate 18% of their total contract dollars across all goods and services and 23% of their yearly contracted information technology spending in September alone. That works out to nearly 60% of Q4 IT contract spending and means that about $17.3 billion in IT is likely to be contracted in the month of September.

Twenty five federal departments and agencies account for about 99% of this IT spending. So which of these biggest spending departments and agencies will have the largest percentage of their IT dollars likely to go out next month? See the chart below.


Twelve of the 25 highest spending departments – roughly half – will obligate 25% or more of their FY 2014 IT contract dollars in September, based on a 5-year average. State and AID will obligate more than a third!  The FY 2009-2013 average September contract spending for these 12 agencies is provided below.


Again, we are looking at an average of over $17 billion in IT spending at these agencies in September. Not all of these funds will necessarily expire at the end of the fiscal year, but the historical spending data averaged over the last five years still supports the trend that these agencies will spend at or near these levels, as it reflects some of the spending impacts of recent trends like shifting and tightening budgets, program delays, and sequestration.

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Originally published in the GovWin FIA Analysts Perspectives Blog. Follow me on Twitter @GovWinSlye.

Lackluster Spending on GSA’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service BPA

 

Remember back in 2010 when the cloud computing hype-cycle was shifting into high gear?  Articles appeared every day describing the benefits of moving to the cloud, industry partners anticipated high agency demand, and then federal CIO, Vivek Kundra, announced his 25 Point Implementation Plan to Reform Federal IT Management.  Based on Kundra’s plan, the Office of Management and Budget mandated that agencies move 3 systems to the cloud.  This motivated the GSA to spend time, money, and effort putting a Blanket Purchase Agreement in place for vendor-provided Infrastructure-as-a-Service solutions.  By all indications the great migration was off and running.  Analysts projected the swell of cloud adoption would become a wave and the wave a white-topped crest that drove federal IT into a new paradigm of utility-based computing, unlimited scalability, and vastly increased savings.

This is what was supposed to happen.  The reality is that agencies dragged their feet and the cloud wave evaporated into puddles that dotted the federal technology landscape.  Among the flotsam and jetsam littering the market shoreline was GSA’s IaaS BPA.  Once anticipated to be THE way that agencies entered the cloud, the IaaS BPA became instead just another little used contract vehicle with poor ROI for the GSA.  You can’t fault GSA for trying to capitalize on a trend.  After all, as an agency driven by the fees it collects from government customers, it was doing what any investor does – try to front-run the market.  Alas, the data below showing spending on the vehicle has been the result.

  • DHS - $2.7M
  • DOE - $579K
  • NEH - $124K
  • Labor - $13K
  • DOJ - $11

By my calculations, federal customers have awarded cloud contracts worth approximately $24 billion since fiscal 2010.  In comparison, 5 agencies have obligated a total of $3.4 million on GSA’s IaaS BPA.  Prefer to compare spending to spending and not to TCV?  According to OMB’s data federal agencies spent $2.1 billion on cloud computing in fiscal 2012.  This number rose to $2.3 billion in fiscal 2013.  By any measurement the amount of money obligated for cloud solutions on the IaaS BPA has been very, very low.  The numbers break out as follows by vendor over the same period of time.

  • CGI Federal - $3.3M
  • Autonomic Resources - $124K
  • AT&T - $13K
  • Verizon - $11K

CGI Federal’s earnings have come from hosting Department of Energy and Department of Homeland Security data, while Autonomic Resources’ earnings from a single hosting project at the National Endowment of Humanities.  Curiously, both AT&T and Verizon won business providing cloud-based mobile telephony services for the Department of Labor and Department of Justice, respectively.

It’s anyone’s guess why spending on the IaaS BPAs has been so low.  Deltek’s cloud contracts data shows that from FY 2010 through FY 2014, federal customers have awarded IaaS contracts worth close to $13 billion dollars.  Most of these contracts have been awarded via Full and Open ($11 billion), GSA IT 70 ($299 million), and Alliant Large Business ($249 million) competitions.  It’s clear that agency customers prefer to compete cloud infrastructure contracts on their own using more expensive unrestricted competitions and other acquisition avenues provided by GSA.  Therefore, the problem with the IaaS BPAs can’t be too high a fee structure.  It can’t cost more to compete contracts unrestricted than to compete them via a BPA, can it?

My guess is that most agency contracting shops simply aren’t aware that the IaaS BPA is available.  In the end they’ve chosen to use the methods they know best and the contracts that are most familiar.  This conclusion is reinforced by the similarly poor use of GSA’s Software-as-a-Service BPA for email.  Spending on it too has been lackluster, but I’ll save this tale for next week.

Labor Wants Platform for Mobile Computing and Open Data

The Department of Labor is requesting additional IT funds for FY 2015 to develop a platform for mobile computing and open data, and build on its ongoing IT modernization initiative.  

The Digital Government Integrated Platform (DGIP) is designed to complete another set of prerequisite and basic IT capabilities department-wide to include VOIP, VTC, and wireless access in Labor national, regional and field office locations.  The platform would be used by all agencies at Labor to build and deploy mobile computing and data sharing applications.  The FY 2015 Exhibit 53 IT budget request shows Labor asking for $9 million in FY 2015 for the effort.

However, the fate of the initiative rests with the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies spending bill which could be stalled for months.  No draft of the bill is available and no markup has been scheduled.

 

Labor strives to promote the welfare of job seekers, wage earners, and retirees in the US, but in recent years has been somewhat hampered by lack of new IT tools.  Despite the challenges, Labor staff members have been able to launch several new initiatives.  Earlier this year, the department successfully moved 17,000 employees to a cloud-based e-mail environment.

 

FCW recently spoke with Labor’s Deputy CIO Dawn Leaf about the DGIP effort.   According to Leaf,”…using the platform would save us about 50 percent, than if the agencies went out and built it and bought it individually."  The majority of costs savings will come from the reduced need for systems integration.  "Sometimes people think because you're using cloud that it's simpler, but it's not really. Your external cloud provider will have requirements, all of your suppliers will have requirements and you'll have to integrate them."  Cost savings from DGIP will come from deploying the platform department-wide rather than individually at each agency, cutting down on integration costs.

 

Leaf stated that the initial stage of the design platform is complete.  “The hardest part might be over – assuming funding is made available,” she said.

 

Federal Fourth Quarter FY 2014, Part 2 – $30B in IT Contracts Likely

The last two months of fiscal year (FY) 2014 are nearly upon us and that puts us on the cusp of the height of the 4th quarter (Q4) “federal IT busy season.” Even with several disruptions that have marked the first half of FY 2014, agencies do have budgets in place and are spending. If historical averages hold, several agencies will spend more than 50% of their FY 2014 contracted IT dollars in Q4.

Last week, I looked at potential total fourth quarter spending for the top 25 departments and agencies across all categories of contracted products and services, based on their reported historical contracted spending over the last several years. This week, I will focus on the Information Technology (IT) category in a similar fashion. (See last week’s entry for more detail on my approach.)

From FY 2009-2013 federal departments reported spending an average of 32% of their yearly contract dollars in the fourth quarter across all spending categories. However, the percentage of Q4 IT contract spending was 39% among the same departments for that period. Agencies tend to buy more of their IT in Q4 compared to other products and services, on average. Translating that into dollars, over the last five fiscal years federal agencies spent an average aggregate of nearly $30 billion on IT hardware, software, and services in Q4 alone. This is the case based on historical spending data, even in the era of sequestration and other budget constraints.

Which departments are the best targets for a firm’s Q4 IT capture efforts? Over the last five fiscal years the following 25 departments or agencies reported the largest overall contracted IT spending and make up 99% of the federal market. The chart below shows their average contracted IT spending in Q4 over the last five years.


Sixteen of the 25 top-spending departments will spend an average of 40% or more of their yearly contracted IT dollars in Q4 (and several more departments are not far behind in percentage points.) Those 16 departments account for an average of $20 billion in combined Q4 IT contracts from FY 2009-2013.

Three departments or agencies historically obligate more than half of their yearly IT contract dollars in the final fiscal quarter: AID (55%), State (56%) and HUD (70%).  Their 5-year average Q4 IT contracted spending is:

  • AID = $141.5 million
  • State = $690.5 million
  • HUD = $181.9 million

Not far behind, the departments that spend between 45% and 48% of their yearly IT contract dollars in Q4 – like HHS, DOJ, SSA, Energy, and DOI – tend to have even larger IT budgets. These five departments account for a combined average of $3.2 billion in Q4 IT contracts over the last 5 fiscal years.

Much of these contract dollars will flow to commodity IT products like software and peripherals, but significant dollars will also go toward IT services. Proposals that were submitted weeks or months ago may come back to the foreground for potential action and companies that can quickly turn around competitive quotes for their federal customers may have a chance at stealing business from incumbents. 

With FY 2014 getting a bit of a slow start due to delayed budgets and agency shutdowns, the rebounding we are seeing in the second half of the year may result in a record-breaking Q4. We will have to wait and see.

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Originally published in the GovWin FIA Analysts Perspectives Blog. Follow me on Twitter @GovWinSlye.

 

Federal Fourth Quarter FY 2014 – Who’s Got the Money?

It’s that time of year again in the federal contracting world – the final quarter of the fiscal year, i.e. the Q4 “busy season.” After a rocky start to FY 2014, marked by budget impasses, shutdowns, continuing resolutions and sequestration, contracted spending appears to be catching up and may be on track for a record fourth quarter. Some federal departments will spend more than 40% of their contract dollars in the next few weeks.  

Due to the topsy-turvy environment over the last few years taking a bit of a historical perspective on spending may help to get a sense of what is likely in store for this Q4. According to their FPDS reported contracted spending over the last seven years, federal departments spent an average of 43.4% of their yearly discretionary budgets with contractors. Applying that percentage to the enacted FY 2014 discretionary budget of $1.127 trillion means over $489 billion in contract spending would be spent in all of FY 2014. Further, from FY 2009-2013 federal departments reported spending about 32% of their yearly contract dollars in the fourth quarter. That means more than $156 billion of FY 2014 contracted spending is likely to be obligated in the last 12 weeks of the fiscal year. Given a slow start in Q1, the actual Q4 amount could be billions higher as agencies work to catch up.

So which departments and agencies are most likely to have big money to spend between now and the end of September?  Looking at total contract obligations over the last five fiscal years, the following 25 departments reported the largest overall contracted spending and make up 99% of the market. The chart below shows their average contracted spending in Q4.

Eight of the largest departments on average spend at least 40% of their contract dollars in the last fiscal quarter and the State Department averages nearly 60%. In average dollar amounts, the Army, Navy, Air Force and DoD will have the most to obligate. From the civilian side HHS, VA, DHS, Energy, and State will be the biggest Q4 spenders.

Contractors need to be well-prepared to meet the needs of their federal customers to effectively and efficiently get these contract needs met by being highly responsive and by providing compelling proposals and bids. The dollars will flow, but where they go may be still up for grabs.


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Originally published in the GovWin FIA Analysts Perspectives Blog. Follow me on Twitter @GovWinSlye.

 

A Possible Contracted Spending Scenario for the Rest of FY 2014

Can you believe that we are half way through fiscal year 2014? Let’s take a look at the data to see what can we tell so far about how much federal departments have spent on contracts at the mid-point in the year and see what might be in store for us in the second half of FY 2014.

When I looked at the mid-fiscal-year spending rates last year, I proposed what I felt was reasonable approach to projecting potential contract obligation rates for the remaining two fiscal quarters. This year I again set a baseline that in FY 2014 agencies will obligate at least 90% of what they did in FY 2013 to drive my general projections for what they might spend on contracts in the second half of the fiscal year. See my previous blog for a more detailed explanation of my approach.

Contract Obligations Compared

The twenty top-spending departments account for $122.4B in combined Q1 and Q2 obligations for FY 2014. If they spend 90% of what they did in FY 2013 they will have $285.5B left to obligate in the remaining two quarters of this fiscal year. (See table below.) Under that assumption, the remaining federal departments and agencies would account for roughly $4.5B for Q3 and Q4, reaching the overall $290B mark for the second half of the year.


Observations

  • Only a few departments have a FY 2014 Q1 and Q2 obligation rate lower than they did in FY 2013, suggesting that their obligation rates may be higher than last year at this time, depending on total final obligations.

  • At this point in FY 2013, each defense branch had reported at least $3 billion more in obligations than they have reported for FY 2014, even under sequestration.
    • Navy has reported $15.2B for FY 2014, compared to $25.3B at this point in FY 2013
    • Army has reported $12.4B for FY 2014 18B, down from $17.8B for FY 2013
    • Defense Agencies have reported $16.6B for FY 2014, compared to $19.1B for FY 2013
    • Air Force has reported $14.1B, compared to $17.3B for FY 2013.

  • Seven of the twenty departments above saw drops of 5% or more from FY 2012 to FY 2013, five of which are civilian agencies, i.e. Energy, NASA, DHS, Justice, and Education. But without exception each of these departments has reported increases in the first two quarters of FY 2014 compared to FY 2013. Energy, NASA, and Education each show increases of 15 percentage points or greater.

  • Energy’s yearly cyclicality continues. During Q1 and Q2 the DoE tends to obligate roughly 45% and 75% alternately from year to year. Looking back at FY 2011 reveals that they spent $11.1B in the first two quarters, which accounted for 45% of their $25.1B total FY 2011 obligations.

  • NASA also reveals cyclicality in its contracting. In FY 2011 NASA reported $6.4B in combined Q1 and Q2 obligations accounting for 41% of their $15.4B total obligations for that year. Looking at the chart above we can see an oscillation in NASA’s obligations since then with $7.8B reported so far in FY 2014. Depending on whether my 90% assumption is pessimistic regarding their final spending will determine whether they have between 40-50% of their budget yet to obligate this fiscal year.

Implications

Some of the year-to-year changes shown above may be due to the appropriations levels and funding priorities that these departments received under the FY 2014 Omnibus funding bill passed earlier this year. However, what these changes more likely indicate is the impact of agencies having actual budgets earlier in the fiscal year, compared to having full-year continuing resolutions that freeze priorities and limit flexibility.

How useful or accurate this kind of macro-level estimation is depends in large part on its main assumptions. Last year this approach pointed to roughly $300 billion in potential combined FY 2013 Q3 and Q4 obligations. The final data shows that actual obligations came in at $265 billion, so my 90% assumption was optimistic in the age of uncertainty, sequestration, and year-long continuing resolutions. Actual combined Q1-Q2 obligations among the top twenty departments declined from $237.1 billion in FY 2012 to $194.0 billion in FY 2013, an 18% drop.

So far in FY 2014, these same departments have reported combined Q1 and Q2 obligations of $122.5 billion, BUT the four largest spenders – the defense branches – have not fully reported their Q2 data. Looking at the civilian departments only give us $65.7 billion, $57.6 billion, and $64.2 billion for FYs 2012, 2013, and 2014 respectively, so FY 2014 is running only 2% below FY 2012 levels and is nearly 12% ahead of FY 2013.  We’ll just have to wait and see what comes from DoD.

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Originally published in the GovWin FIA Analysts Perspectives Blog. Follow me on Twitter @GovWinSlye.

Congress Set to Pass FY 2014 Funding – Would Avert Shutdown, Mute Sequestration

The U.S. Congress is expected to pass an omnibus funding bill for the remainder of fiscal year (FY) 2014 that includes $1 trillion in discretionary federal funds.

The Hill reported that H.R. 3547 passed the House and is now moving onto the Senate. The bill is a compromise measure in keeping with the budget agreement the two parties reached late in 2013. As such, the bill is set to increase total discretionary spending to $1.102 trillion in FY 2014, an increase over the $986 billion that was originally planned.

If the final bill passes the Senate and is signed by the President, as is expected at the time of this writing, another looming government shutdown will have been averted. Further, departments and agencies that have been coping with the limitations imposed under the “same stuff, different day” scenario that accompanies continuing resolutions (CR) will have real appropriations with operating budgets and more program flexibility, even if their budgets don’t necessarily grow.

Year-over-Year Changes

The pending omnibus would, in one sweeping appropriations, address funding for each of the agencies covered under the twelve individual appropriations bills that traditionally make their way through Congress.  Barring any unexpected changes in either chamber, a summary of the appropriation’s impact on departmental budgets is presented in the table below and following descriptions.

Department of Defense

Total FY 2014 funding is set at $572B and includes $487B in base budget and $85B for OCO.

  • Military Personnel (MILPERS) - $129B, up $1.3B from FY 2013. Includes 1% pay raise for armed forces and civilian workforce, the first civilian raise in 4 years.
  • O&M - $160B, down $13.6B from FY 2013. Priority on essential readiness programs, including $447M for CYBERCOM
  • Procurement - $92.9B, down $7.5B from FY 2013 enacted level.
  • RDT&E - $63B, $6.9B below FY 2013
  • Military Construction (MILCON) - $9.8B, a decrease of $817M from FY 2013
  • These budget categories (MILPERS, etc.) are split and aggregate across the four defense areas as follows:
    • Air Force - $133B, Army - $117B, Navy/Marine Corps - $144B, Defense-wide - $57B
  • Identifiable OCO spending breaks out as follows:
    • Air Force - $16.5B, Army - $40B, Navy/Marine Corps - $14B, Defense-wide - $7.4B
  • Includes a 1% pay raise to members of the Armed Forces and the Department of Defense civilian workforce. This is the first pay raise for Department of Defense civilians in four years.
  • Supports readiness with O&M funding that is $11B higher than under a full-year CR.
  • Provides $1B billion for the National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account to ensure Guard and Reserve units have the critical equipment necessary for both homeland security and overseas missions.
  • Includes $2.4B to continue operation and begin modernization of nine Navy ships which had been proposed for retirement due to budget constraints
  • Adds $175M for the Rapid Innovation Program and $75M for the Industrial Base Innovation Fund to promote the development of new technologies and timely fielding of critical equipment.
  • Instead of across-the-board sequestration cuts, the bill proposes 1,065 specific cuts to programs and redirects some of those funds to higher priorities.
  • Translates delays in acquisition programs into spending deferments and reductions, including:
    • $204M from the Army’s Warfighter Information Network-Tactical Increment II due to test issues
    • $85M from the Air Force’s Space Fence radar system due to acquisition delays
    • $45M from follow-on development of the Navy’s E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft due to contract delays.

Health and Human Services

HHS funding is part of the broader Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriation which totals $156.8 billion in discretionary funding, and the Agriculture Appropriation.  We estimate the HHS portion of these appropriations to be $80B.  HHS highlights of the omnibus bill include the following:

  • $2.6B for FDA, $217M above FY 2013
  • $3.7B for CMS management and operations, equal to the sequester level
  • $6.9B for the CDC, $567 million above the FY 2013
  • $4.4B for the Indian Health Service, $304M above the post-sequestration level
  • $29.9B for NIH, $1B above FY 2013 post-sequester
  • $30.9B for ACF, $782M above FY 2013 enacted level
  • $3.6B for SAMHSA, $144M over FY 2013 enacted level
  • $8.6B for Head Start, a $1B above the post-sequestration level
  • $2.36B for the Child Care and Development Block Grant, $154M above FY 2013
  • $3.6B Community Health Centers (CHCs), a $700 million increase
  • $2.3B HIV/AIDs Programs, a $70M increase
  • The bill provides no new funding for ObamaCare, and holds the line on ObamaCare funding in CMS.
  • $305 million for CMS to allow for the timely processing and payment of benefits, and the continuation of essential services for the increasing number of Americans who rely on traditional Medicare programs.

Education

  • $250M for Race to the Top—Preschool Development  to be used for grants to States
  • $11.5B for IDEA/Special Education 
  • $14.4B for Title I/Disadvantaged Schools, a $625M increase
  • $1.2B for 21st Century Community Learning Centers, an increase of $58M
  • $1.3B for Impact Aid, an increase of $65M
  • $22.8B for the Pell Grant program

Veterans Affairs

VA funding is part of the broader Military Construction/Veterans Affairs Appropriations.  VA’s discretionary funding totals $63.2B for FY 2014.  VA highlights of the omnibus bill include the following:

  • $55.6B in FY 2015 advance appropriations for veterans medical care
  • $20M above the budget request to upgrade computer hardware, such as servers, in VA Regional Offices to handle the advanced program requirements of the Veterans Benefits Management System
  • $250M for rural health care, including telehealth and mobile clinics
  • Mandates several requirements before the VA can obligate more than 25% of the funding for  Vista electronic health record modernization
  • $4B in FY 2014 to meet the health care needs of veterans who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan
  • $4.9B to provide healthcare for women veterans in FY2014
  • $7.6B for Long Term Care
  • $586M for Medical and Prosthetic Research
  • $3.7B for Information Technology, $20M over the request
  • $140M – an increase of $20 million above the President’s request and $26 million above
  • the fiscal year 2013 enacted level – for information technology upgrades at regional offices to
  • manage the improved paperless claims processing system;
  • $250 million for rural health care, including telehealth and mobile clinics, for veterans in rural and highly rural areas, including Native American populations.
  • Minor Construction within the VA is funded at $715M – the same as the President’s request and $108 million above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level.

State and International Programs

  • $49B includes $6.5B for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) and $15.7B in base and contingency funding for operational costs of the State Department and related agencies
  • $1.3B for USAID operations, of which $91 million is for contingency funding

Homeland Security

Overall FY 2014 discretionary spending for DHS is $39.3B, a reduction of $336 million from the FY 2013 enacted level.

  • Coast Guard: $10.2B overall, of which $8.7B is discretionary spending. The bill also provides $425 million in targeted increases above the FY 2014 request to support front line personnel with resources, including $23 million and $2 million respectively for pre-acquisition design work of the Offshore Patrol Cutter and for initial acquisition planning and design of a new polar icebreaker.
  • Transportation Security Administration (TSA): $7.4B for TSA is reduced by $2.1B in offsetting collections and fees. The bill includes funding for investments in explosives detection systems, passenger screening technologies, and air cargo security. The bill includes $177 million for passenger screening technologies, $93 million for Secure Flight, which matches passenger data against records contained in portions of the Terrorist Screening Database, $83 million for expedited and other vetting programs, and $25 million for the Federal Flight Deck Officer and Flight Crew Training program.
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP): $10.6B, which adds $111 million above the FY 2013 enacted level. Adds $91 million above the budget request for Air and Marine operations and procurement of critical assets, including enhanced radar for unmanned aircraft systems and restoring the 30% cut to flight hours proposed in the budget. Adds $10 million for trusted traveler programs, including additional Global Entry kiosks and mobile document readers, expanding preclearance activities, and for border transformation programs like the land border integration effort and the port runner/absconder program.
  • U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): $5.6B for ICE, of which $2.8B is for detention and removal operations, including border patrol, special agents and immigration officials.
  • United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS): $116 million in direct appropriations for USCIS and with $114 million, fully funds the E-Verify employment eligibility verification system.
  • United States Secret Service: $1.6B, expands cyber training provided by the Secret Service to state and local law enforcement officials, grows cooperation between the Secret Service and the FBI in cybersecurity, and maintains the Service’s primary role in protecting U.S. financial systems in cyberspace.
  • Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO): $285 million, including $14 million for handheld portable radiation detectors, $71 million for research and development of next-generation detection technologies, and $22 million for the Securing the Cities program.
  • National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD): $1.2B for the Infrastructure Protection and Information Security Program, including $792 million for cybersecurity protection of Federal networks and incident response, consisting in part of:
    • $382 million for intrusion detection on civilian Federal networks
    • $200 million to build on a new monitoring and diagnostics program begun in 2013 to better protect civilian Federal networks against threats through real time analysis of day-to-day activity
    • $15.8 million for cybersecurity education to train future cyber warriors
  • Science and Technology (S&T): $1.2B, sustains investment in high-priority research and development efforts, including $404 million in funding for the construction of the National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF).  
  • Office of Health Affairs (OHA): $127 million, including $85 million for the Bio-Watch Program and $2 million to complete demonstration projects through the Chemical Defense Program.

Housing and Urban Development

  • HUD’s operating budget declines this year as FY 2014 discretionary funding of $32.8B represents a 2% decrease from the FY 2013 enacted level of $33.5B.
  • Funding includes:
    • $26.3B for Public and Indian Housing (increase of $411M from FY 2013 enacted and $1.5B below FY 2014 request)
    • $10.5B for Housing Programs ($561M above FY 2013 enacted and $381M below FY 2014 request)
    • $6.6B for Community Planning and Development Programs ($145M less than FY 2013 enacted)
  • Provisions of Interest
    • $36M for the HUD OCIO.
    • $250M for development, modernization, enhancement and maintenance of Department-wide and program-specific IT programs.

Justice

  • Bolsters resources for DOJ capabilities to counter growing cyber threats. Within 120 days of enactment, DOJ is to provide a multiyear strategic plan that identifies resources, programs and coordination structures need to enable prevention of and more rapid response to future cyber attacks.
  • Justice Information Sharing Technology (JIST):  $25.8 million in funding for JIST, as well as enabling the Attorney General to transfer funds to this account from funds available to DOJ for enterprise-wide IT initiatives.
  • National Security Division (NSD): $91.8 million for the NSD, including funds to support the Intelligence Community to combat cyber threats at with resources that at least match FY 2013 levels.
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI): Receives $8.3 billion, an increase of $232 million over FY 2013 enacted levels.
    • $8.2 billion for salaries and expenses of the FBI.
    • $390.0 million in resources to continue support its Next Generation Cyber Initiative and cyber task forces
    • The FBI is expected to increase resources for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) by $60,000,000 to expand capacity of NICS to meet rising demand for system resources.
  • Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA): $2.4 billion, marking a rise of $21 million over FY 2013 levels.
  • Includes $361.0 million for regulatory and enforcement efforts to combat prescription drug abuse.
  • Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF): $1.18 billion, an increase of $47 million over FY 2013 enacted.
  • Includes resources for the updating and expanding of the National Integrated Ballistic Imaging Network (NIBIN).
  • U.S. Marshals Service: $2.7 billion, marking a decrease of $72 million from FY 13 due to reduced estimates for federal detention requirements.
  • Federal Prison System (BOP): $6.9 billion, an increase of $79 million above FY 2013 enacted.
  • Maintains staffing levels and continues activation of new prisons.
  • Grants Program: $2.2 billion for various state and local grant programs, $32 million above FY 2013 enacted level.
  • State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance: $1.17 billion for initiatives including victims of human trafficking, DNA grants, Byrne-Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) subgrantees, as well as National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) Initiative grants.

Energy

  • National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA): Receives $11.2 billion to maintain the safety, security, and readiness of the nation’s nuclear weapons stockpile.
    • Increases funding for Weapons Activities by $847 million over FY 2013, providing $7.845 billion in FY 2014.
    • Critical defense funding upholds national nuclear deterrence posture.
    • Includes $537 million to extend the life of the B61 nuclear bomb.
  • Energy Programs: Increases funding for energy programs to $10.2 billion, a $620 million rise over FY 13 enacted levels. Including:
    • $562 million for research and development to advance coal, natural gas, oil, and other fossil energy technologies. ($28 million above FY13 enacted level)
    • $889 million for nuclear energy research and development to further next generation of nuclear power. ($36 million over the FY13 enacted level.)
  • Science Research: Office of Science receives $5.071 billion ($450 million over FY 2013) for breakthroughs in energy applications and development of next-generation high performance computing systems.
  • Provides $280 million for Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), an increase of $29 million over FY 2013, to develop promising/high-risk future energy technologies.
  • Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) programs receive $1.9 billion, an increase of $182 million over FY 2013, to advance biomass, electric vehicle, and energy efficient advanced manufacturing technologies.
  • Defense Environmental Cleanup receives $5.0 billion, an increase of $381 million above FY 2013.
  • Cuts funding for Nuclear Nonproliferation by $289 million from FY 2013, providing $1.954 billion for FY 2014.
  • Provides $147 million for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, including $5 million within Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems to enhance full-scale electric grid testing capabilities associated with integration of wireless technologies, power generation, and communications and control systems.

Agriculture

  • USDA’s operating budget is a winner this year as FY 2014 discretionary funding of $20.9B represents a 2% increase over the FY 2013 enacted level of $20.5B.
  • Funding includes:
    • $5.5B for the Forest Service
    • $2.6B for Agriculture Research
    • $292.8M for the Forest Service
    • $828M for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
    • $1.5B for the Farm Service Agency
    • $2.4B for Rural Development ($180M above FY 2013 enacted level)
    • $1B for the Food Safety and Inspection Service ($19M below FY 2013 enacted level)
    • $2.6B for the Food and Drug Administration (Restores $85M in fee revenue lost dues to sequestration)
    • $215M for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission ($100M below President’s 2014 Request)
    • $826M for the Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Provisions of Interest
    • Budget contains requirements for the Secretary of Agriculture to eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.
    • Makes cuts to lower-priority programs.
    • Provides $44M for the USDA OCIO, no less than $27M of which is to be spent on USDA cybersecurity requirements.
    • Provides $4.2M for APHIS’ IT infrastructure.
    • Increases CIO governance over IT expenses, requiring the CIO to approve of any investment greater than $25K before the investment is made.
    • Stipulates no new IT system or upgrade of current systems may be acquired without OCIO and Executive IT Investment Review Board approval.

Transportation

  • DOT’s operating budget is flat this year as FY 2014 discretionary funding of $17.8B represents a 0.5% decrease from the FY 2013 enacted level of $17.9B.
  • Funding includes:
    • $41B for the Federal Highway program (same level authorized in the MAP-21 transportation authorization legislation that expires on September 30, 2014); an increase of $557M from FY 2013 enacted
    • $12.4B for the Federal Aviation Administration ($168M below FY 2013 enacted);
    • $1.6B for the Federal Railroad Administration (decrease of $34.6M from FY 2013 enacted)
    • $2.15B for the Federal Transit Administration (decrease of $100M from FY 2013 enacted)
    • $819M in mandatory and discretionary funding for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (increase of $8.9M over FY 2013 enacted)
    • $585M for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (increase of $24M above FY 2013 enacted)
    • $12.8M increase over the FY 2013 level for the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  • Provisions of Interest
    • Funding for FAA NextGen investments is preserved.
    • $15.7M for the DOT OCIO.
    • $7M for upgrading and enhancing the DOT’s financial systems and re-engineering business processes.
    • $4.45M for cybersecurity initiatives.

NASA

  • Preserves balance of NASA portfolio across science, aeronautics, technology and human space flight.
  • Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM): Completion of significant preliminary activities is needed prior to NASA and Congress making long-term commitment to this mission concept.
  • Science: Funding totals $5.15B, including Education and Public Outreach, Earth Science, Planetary Science, Astrophysics, and Heliophysics.
    • Prior to expending any funds on the development of JPSS climate sensors, NASA is to prepare development plans with notional budget and schedule details for submission to the Appropriations Committee.
    • Under Planetary Science, Mars Exploration receives $288 million, including $65 million for the development of the Mars 2020 Rover.
  • Aeronautics: Funding amounts to $566 million.
  • Space Technology: Funding totals $576 million.
  • Exploration: $4.1 billion for Exploration mission directorate, including Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Space Launch System programs.
    • $1.6 billion is provided for the Space Launch System (SLS) to sustain core development of mission components. Due to concerns regarding diversion of funds for activities with only tangential relevance to the SLS, NASA is expected to complete quarterly spending reports on additional potential for the investment along with tracking milestones and development schedules.
    • $1.2 billion is provided for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, including $3 million for Construction and Environmental Compliance and Restoration.
  • Space Operations: $3.8 billion for Space Operations, including strong support for the International Space Station (ISS).
  • Cross Agency Support: $2.8 billion in Cross Agency Support funds security, infrastructure, and reports.
  • Office of Inspector General to receive $37.5 million.
  • Administrative Provisions include establishing terms and conditions for the transfer of funds.

Labor

  • $2.6B for Job Training through for Workforce Investment Act Grants to States, an increase of $121M
  • $80M for Unemployment Insurance (UI) Program Integrity, an increase of $16M
  • $10.4B for the Employment Training Administration, a decrease of $562M from FY 2013 enacted level
  • $1.7B for the Office of Job Corps
  • $269.5M for Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS)

Treasury

  • $112M for the FinCEN (Financial Crimes Enforcement Network ), $7M above a FY 2014 full-year CR level
  • $226M for the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI), $17M above a FY 2014 full-year CR level
  • $11.3B for IRS
  • $35M Treasury Inspector General, a $7M increase
  • $156.4M Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, a $12.6M above a FY 2014 full-year CR level
  • $92M to help address identity theft and refund fraud, combat offshore tax evasion, and improve delivery of services to taxpayers. 
  • The bill includes no additional funding for ObamaCare
  • $3M available until 9/30/15 for IT modernization requirements
  • Up to $250M available until 9/30/15 for IT support
  • $313M available until 9/30/16 for capital asset acquisition of IT systems, including management and related contractual costs for business systems modernization.

Interior

  • $954 million for the Bureau of Reclamation’s Water and Related Resources, $106 million over FY 2013.
  • Bureau of Land Management (BLM): Funded at $1.1 billion, marking an increase of $7 million above FY 2013 enacted. Provides for effective stewardship of public lands.
  • National Park Services (NPS): $2.6 billion, an increase of $28.5 million over FY 2013 enacted. Allows every national park to remain open for the duration of FY 2014.
  • U.S. Forest Service: $5.5 billion, including increases for wildfire fighting and management.
  • United States Geological Survey (USGS): Provides $1.03 billion for Surveys, Investigations, and Research, including an increase of $400,000 for data preservation.
  • American Indian and Alaska Native Programs:  Provides funding for health care, law enforcement, and education.
    • Indian Health Services: Receives $4.3 billion in funding, an increase of $78 million over FY 2013 enacted levels.
    • Bureau of Indian Affairs and Education:  Provides $2.5 billion in funding, an $18 million increase over FY 2013 enacted levels.
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS): $1.4 billion, a decrease of $32 million from the FY 2013 enacted levels. This funding provides for compensating ranchers for livestock loss, stopping spread of mussel and fish varieties, and species conservation.
  • Fully funds request for information technology management.

Commerce

  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA): $5.3 billion, marking an increase of $310 million over the FY 2013 enacted levels.
    • Including $953.6 million for the National Weather Service as well as $187.1 million for the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) operations, research, and facilities.
    • Fully funds NOAA’s weather satellite programs (GOES-R and JPSS). Although NOAA is expected to focus on the weather satellite program and to better address gaps in its FY 2015 budget, NOAA will continue to provide quarterly updates to the Committees on Appropriations regarding its weather satellite portfolio.
  • Bureau of Census: $945.0 million, including $693.0 million for periodic censuses and programs.
  • United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO): $3.0 billion, marking an increase of $91 million over FY13.
    • Maintains provision that USPTO makes available any fees collected in excess of estimates.
    • Adopts language from the House and Senate reports for Patents End-to-End. USPTO will submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations within 90 days of the Act’s enactment.
  • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST): $850 million for NIST, increase of $41 million over FY13 enacted, including $651.0 million for NIST’s scientific and technical core programs.
    • Increase of $5.0M for cyber security research. Increase of $1.0M for disaster resilience research.
    • $4.0M for the National Initiative for Cybersecurity (NICE) Program.
    • $15.0M for the National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence.
    • $16.5M to maintain the current operating level for the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC).
  • International Trade Administration (ITA): $470.0 million in total resources, offset by $9.4 million in estimated fee collection.
  • Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS): $101.5 million for operations and administration.
  • Economic Development Administration (EDA): $246.5 million for programs, including $209.5 million for Economic Development Assistance Programs.
  • Minority Business Development Agency: Receives $28.0 million in funding.
  • Economic and Statistical Analysis: Provides $99.0 million in funding.
  • Working Capital Fund: Rather than supporting the level requested for the WCF, the Commerce Department is expected to submit a list of transfers to and activities funded from the WCF along with its 2014 spending plan. The agreement supports the plan to establish the Enterprise Security Operations Center from the WCF.


Fellow GovWin Federal Industry Analysis (FIA) analysts Kyra Fussell, Angela Petty, and Alex Rossino contributed to this entry.

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Originally published for Federal Industry Analysis: Analysts Perspectives Blog. Stay ahead of the competition by discovering more about GovWin FIA. Follow on twitter 
@FIAGovWin.

Could We See $230 Billion in Fourth Quarter Federal Spending?

As we enter the second half of July federal agencies and contractors alike are preparing for the close out of fiscal year (FY) 2013, ending September 30th. This is commonly referred to as the “federal busy season,” when agencies work to finish up whatever procurements they need to award within the fiscal year, and is often characterized by a flurry of last-minute spending in a “use it or lose it” mentality. So will we see such a spending spree in the age of sequestration and widely-reported budget constraints?  Even with these uncertain factors, recent spending data suggests that we still could see more than $230 billion in contracted spending in the fourth quarter (Q4) of the fiscal year.

Previously, I tried to beat back some of the fear and uncertainty with some data analysis. In a previous blog post I looked at the reported Q1-Q2 obligations among the top spending 20 federal agencies for FY 2012 to try to estimate what we might possibly see for FY 2013, even if we experience a 10% across-the-board reduction in contracted spending.  Given that the Department of Defense (DoD) and several other departments tend to lag by 90 days in some of their contracts reporting I thought an update and comparison might be informative.

The results for these lagging agencies are not insignificant, especially for the defense branches. (See table below.) The Q1-Q2 data reported by the beginning of July (green) included some sizeable increases compared to the same quarters reported at the beginning of April (blue). The differences are noted in both dollars and percentage (red).  Note that all the FY ’13 percentages and remaining dollars are based on an assumption of 10% reduction from FY ’12 levels.

 

The data reporting lag among these 20 agencies resulted in $60 billion in obligations being reported in the 3 months after the close of Q2. So when it came to assessing where we are at the end of Q3 and what is potentially left to spend in Q4 I wanted to factor in this data lag to get as accurate a picture as possible, given the available data.

FY 2013 Q1-Q3 Obligations and What’s Left for Q4

Completing a similar FY 2012-2013 comparison for Q1-Q3 reveals that the top 20 agencies could have over $225 billion left to spend in Q4, even with a 10% cut from FY 2012. (See table below.) The remaining federal agencies that report to FPDS account for an additional $5 billion under this framework.

In an attempt to account for the delayed reporting by DoD and select other agencies, the Q3 data, which is the lagging quarter, is adjusted according to the percentage difference between April and July Q1-Q2 data in the table above. While this is not perfectly precise, I believe it is a reasonable approach to mitigate for the data lag and give us a little better shot at seeing what Q4 might look like. (The 90% assumption still applies.)

 

 

Comparing the historical Q1-Q3 percentage of total yearly obligations for FY 2012 and a projection for the same for FY 2013 shows that many of the departments have a hefty chunk left to spend and that has been their historical norm, at least for FY 2012.

To put this into the total federal context, all reported federal contract obligations for Q4 of FY 2012 were $161 billion and total FY 2012 contract obligations topped $517 billion. Total FY 2013 obligations for Q1-Q3 total $240 billion, when accounting for data reporting lags by the Defense Department and other agencies.

So if my 90% assumption were to play out and my data lag adjustment is anywhere in the ballpark we could see total FY 2013 obligations top out at $465 billion with nearly half of FY 2013 obligations coming in the Q4. That sounds like folks will be pretty busy to me.

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Originally published for Federal Industry Analysis: Analysts Perspectives Blog. Stay ahead of the competition by discovering more about GovWin FIA. Follow me on Twitter @GovWinSlye.
 

Want more?  Get additional perspectives and a deeper dive into the potential for a big Q4 with our free July 30, 2013 webinar: Pent Up Demand: Prepare for the Fourth Quarter Super-Sized Spending Spree

Get more information and register here.

 

 

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