GovWin SLED Coronavirus Recon

Published: June 23, 2020

Coronavirus (COVID-19) PandemicRecon

GovWin's SLED Coronavirus Recon, produced by Deltek's SLED Market Research team, is designed to support awareness and understanding of the response to coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic by state, local, and educational (SLED) entities and the contractors that support them.

General

  • COVID MEMO: Utah quickly getting to point that complete shutdown is 'only viable option'
    • In a memo sent to health and state government officials last Friday, State Epidemiologist Dr. Angela Dunn warns that "we are quickly getting to a point where ... a complete shutdown" will be the only viable option to manage spread and deaths from COVID-19, because of the recent acceleration phase.
  • Race is on to replenish supply stockpile amid concerns of a second coronavirus wave
    • Concerns over federal preparedness for a second wave persist at the state level where officials are taking matters into their own hands and working on bolstering their own stockpiles, following the supply scramble that unfolded earlier this year.
  • Gov. Edwards: Louisiana not ready to loosen restrictions meant to control COVID-19
    • Louisiana is not ready to further loosen the restrictions placed on businesses meant to control the spread of COVID-19, Gov. John Bel Edwards said Monday. The decision comes amid a recent increase of cases that cannot be explained by an increase in the number of tests. The number of COVID-19 patients in hospitals also has been rising, and on Monday, the state reported its largest increase of hospitalizations since April.
  • Virginia's Supreme Court lifts freeze on evictions; Stoney pledges CARES Act funds to address issue
    • Evictions can resume in Virginia next week after the state's high court lifted a ban on eviction hearings in response to COVID-19. The ban, instituted initially in March and extended earlier this month, expires June 28 and will not be extended another time, according to an order from Virginia Supreme Court Chief Justice Donald Lemons, meaning eviction hearings can resume June 29. The decision puts nearly 2,000 families in Richmond, which has one of the country's highest eviction rates, in danger of eviction.
  • Mail-in deluge tests elections in Kentucky, New York
    • Overwhelmed Kentucky and New York officials faced a deluge of mail-in votes likely to delay results for days after high-profile primaries Tuesday, contests testing if establishment Democratic congressional candidates can withstand challengers fueled by voter fury over racism.

Funding & Economic Impact

  • Ohio asks vendors to take pay cuts as pandemic crunches budget
    • Ohio officials asked state-government vendors, including technology suppliers, to take 15% cuts to their payment as the state attempts to weather the financial fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • CARES Act Coronavirus Relief Fund Not Enough to Support Local Government Reopening and Recovery
    • The National League of Cities recognizes the Treasury’s efforts on sharing funds in the CARES Act, but additional direct funding to communities is an absolute necessity if we wish to maintain the millions of jobs and livelihoods in America’s cities, towns, and villages; support essential services at a local level in every state during the nation’s ongoing health crisis; and facilitate reopening and economic recovery.
  • Newsom agrees to rethink sharp California budget cuts in deal with lawmakers
    • Gov. Gavin Newsom agreed to largely abandon the far-reaching spending reductions he proposed as necessary without new federal coronavirus relief funds, striking a budget pact with leaders of the California Legislature that relies on a mix of different cuts, along with a more optimistic economic outlook, to protect social services programs and public schools.
  • South Dakota cities and counties to receive $200 million in COVID-19 relief funding
    • While in Sioux Falls, Gov. Kristi Noem announced that South Dakota cities and counties will receive $200 million in CARES Act federal funding for coronavirus relief.
  • Connecticut State Relief Program To Funnel Federal Funds To Towns
    • Gov. Ned Lamont announced that his administration is establishing the Connecticut Municipal Coronavirus Relief Fund Program, which will set a process by which municipal governments will receive reimbursements from the state using the federally supported Coronavirus Relief Fund to offset their expenses related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • (Pennsylvania) Commissioners to discuss how to split up funding
    • The Pennsylvania General Assembly divided $625 million to counties across the state from the CARES Act, federal COVID-19 relief funding.
  • (Minnesota) City, county leaders press Gov. Tim Walz on $841M in COVID-19 aid
    • Leaders of Minnesota cities and counties dealing with the costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are pressing Gov. Tim Walz to release $841 million in federal aid that was held up in a partisan stalemate at the end of the legislative special session.
  • (Utah) Legislators Cut All Budgets Except Education And Social Services
    • The Utah legislature met in special session passing dozens of bills, most related to budget cuts, in response to COVID-19 revenue shortfalls. Legislators elected to appropriate small increases in education and social services funding.
  • Woolpert, Centric helping local governments maximize CARES act funding
    • Dayton, Ohio-based Woolpert and Centric Consulting are working together to help local governments access, maximize and expedite funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The longtime partners will provide CARES Act Advisory and Implementation Services to enable municipalities to track, process, utilize and benefit from resources related to COVID-19.
  • Treasurer: Louisiana business grant program to begin in July
    • Lawmakers set aside $300 million of CARES Act funds for the small business grants and businesses could start seeing grants as soon as next month, according Louisiana’s state treasurer.
  • Newsom agrees to rethink sharp California budget cuts in deal with lawmakers
    • Gov. Gavin Newsom agreed Monday to largely abandon the far-reaching spending reductions he proposed as necessary without new federal coronavirus relief funds, striking a budget pact with leaders of the California Legislature that relies on a mix of different cuts, along with a more optimistic economic outlook, to protect social services programs and public schools.
  • Delaware Budget Panel Restores Certain Employee Pay Plans
    • The General Assembly’s budget-writing committee has restored funding for certain state employee pay raises after officials bumped up Delaware’s official revenue forecast.
  • Louisiana To Begin Spending $811 Million In Federal COVID-19 Aid
    • The federal government allocated $1.8 billion to Louisiana’s state government. Initially, $811 million was to be set aside for local governments, though Louisiana lawmakers decided to carve out $300 million from the local portion for the business fund. Gov. John Bel Edwards’ Division of Administration is distributing the $511 million currently allocated to local governments.
  • (Wyoming) State Agencies Prepare For Program Cuts, Layoffs Amid Historic Revenue Shortfall
    • Earlier this month, facing the largest decline in revenue in state history, Gov. Mark Gordon directed state agencies to prepare for a 20% cut to Wyoming’s budget for the upcoming biennium, with initial proposals due July 1.

Higher Education

  • (Connecticut) UConn to Implement Furlough Days For Some Managers Amid $50M Budget Shortfall
    • Facing its biggest budget deficit in history, UConn will furlough managers for one day per month without pay in a cost-saving measure.
  • Department of Education uncovers billions in unreported foreign funds at higher education institutions
    • Higher education institutions are required by law to report foreign gifts and contracts valued at more than $250,000 to be in compliance with Section 117 of the Higher Education Act of 1965. Currently, the Department is not receiving sufficient information to determine compliance with Section 117’s provisions, according to a Department of Education press release.
    • The Department of Education’s own research uncovered billions of dollars in unreported funds from foreign sources to higher education institutions.
  • Colleges cut academic programs in the face of budget shortfalls due to Covid-19
    • As colleges and universities across the country face extreme financial distress, some institutions are cutting the academic programs that were once central to a well-rounded education. This includes majors, programs, and support which is coming after many universities have already furloughed employees, reduced salaries, and cut sports teams.
  • Coronavirus delaying use of New Jersey's resurrected higher education P3 program
    • Financial challenges surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic may prompt New Jersey colleges to hold off on using the state’s re-launched public-private partnership program. P3 law, which took effect last year, provides colleges with increased financing options, and the expectation is that most schools will wait until the current health crisis subsides before tackling new infrastructure initiatives.
  • Emory, State of Georgia Collaborate on COVID-19 Response
    • Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health will embark on a new partnership with the state of Georgia in increasing its public health resources to combat the COVID-19 crisis.
    • The Emory COVID-19 Response Collaborative (ECRC), established within Rollins, will provide ongoing, flexible and collaborative support to the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) in four major areas: planning coordination; outbreak response and evaluation; training and deployment of public health professionals throughout the state; and surveillance, research and monitoring.

K-12 Education

  • (Massachusetts) COVID Tax Woes Delay Funding For $1.4 Billion Student Opportunity Act
    • The Massachusetts Department of Revenue's Division of Local Services issued a bulletin to cities and towns telling them to expect level-funding through at least the end of August. Fiscal year 2021 was supposed to be the start of a new $1.4 billion dollar investment in K-12 schools through the Student Opportunity Act signed by Gov. Charlie Baker last November, but the coronavirus economy means delaying that promise to cities and towns.
  • (Michigan) COVID-19 takes toll on East Lansing schools' budget, but no layoffs expected
    • East Lansing Public Schools will use at least $1.1 million from its savings to balance a budget racked by COVID-19.
    • Finance Director Richard Pugh expects to see a $700-per-student cut in state funding next school year. He included the assumption in a $41.1 million 2020-21 budget the district's Board of Education approved. It required cuts and a $1.1 million fund balance withdrawal, bringing the reserve balance down to $5.4 million.
  • Coronavirus, budget cuts imperil Nevada's struggling schools
    • Nevada teachers and administrators worry the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent economic fallout threaten to reverse recent funding hikes passed in 2019 that have buoyed their efforts to lift the state from near the bottom of the nation's education rankings.
  • Indiana offers public schools $61M in remote learning grants
    • INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana’s public schools can apply for funding to improve their remote learning capabilities during the coronavirus pandemic through a $61.6 million grant program, Gov. Eric Holcomb announced.
  • (Kentucky) Masks for every student, 30,000 laptops and more: How JCPS plans to spend COVID-19 funds
    • The Jefferson County Public School District wants to use a share of the $30 million they received to purchase disposable masks for every student, mass quantities of hand sanitizer and gloves, and thousands of laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots.
  • (Texas) Austin school board OKs $1.65 billion budget amid calls to divert district police funds
    • The 2020-21 budget sets aside spending $33 million in coronavirus related expenses, including technology for remote learning, training materials and PPE.
  • (Connecticut) Budgets Put Limits on Social Distancing Options for Schools
    • As schools consider how and when to reopen their buildings during the pandemic, many are finding themselves overwhelmed by the potential expenses that would come with operating under social distancing guidelines: protective equipment, staff for smaller classrooms, and additional transportation to keep students spread out on bus rides.
  • In California budget deal, no cuts for K-12 but billions in late payments to schools
    • Gov. Gavin Newsom and legislative leaders announced that they have reached an agreement on the 2020-21 budget that will preserve spending for K-12 schools and community colleges at current levels but potentially could result in funding cuts of nearly $1 billion combined for the University of California and California State University.
  • (New Mexico) APS To Expand Online Learning to All Grades
    • The district's online high school, eCademy, will be expanded to include students in kindergarten through eighth grade.
  • Baldwin, Colleagues: $175 Billion Education Investment Urgently Needed to Save the 2021 School Year & U.S. Economy
    • Senator Baldwin and 41 Senate Democrats, led by Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), are calling for at least $175 billion for the Elementary and Secondary Education Relief Fund in any future coronavirus relief package.
  • Budgets put limits on social distancing options for schools
    • As schools consider how and when to reopen their buildings during the pandemic, many are finding themselves overwhelmed by the potential expenses that would come with operating under social distancing guidelines: protective equipment, staff for smaller classes and additional transportation to keep students spread out on bus rides.
  • New Mexico Releases Plan For Reopening Public Schools
    • New Mexico's Public Education Department is outlining a path for how schools will reopen this fall amid the coronavirus pandemic. The current plan will require schools to open at 50 percent capacity alternating students between in-person learning and online classes at home. The goal is to move into a full school schedule as safely as possible.

Health Care

Social Services 

  • (New York) Governor Cuomo Announces $65 Million NY Forward Child Care Expansion Incentive
    • The funding available includes $20 million to assist childcare programs with reopening and expansion of capacity by providing materials to support a more socially distant model, and $45 million in childcare Reopening and Expansion Incentive funds to pay for 50% of the cost of a newly opened classroom as an incentive to open the classroom.
  • Alaska child care providers to receive $10.5M in virus funds
    • With child care being critical to the state’s economy to allow parents to return to work, Alaska’s government has announced that child care providers will receive an additional $10.5 million from the state’s portion of federal relief funds.

Transportation

Public Utilities